Guest Post, Manuscripts, Outreach

Teachable Features 1: Binding Error, MS Bodl. 565

I’ve just written a blog for Teaching the Codex, the manuscript pedagogy initiative I run with my colleague, Dr Tristan Franklinos. We are launching a series called ‘Teachable Features’, as a resource for teachers to give quick demonstrations, as well as for anyone interested in learning about manuscripts who does not have immediate access to them.

“I originally described this binding error (amongst other issues relating to the manuscript) in an article for the Bodleian Library Record (April 2015, pp. 22-36), and it is by kind permission of the editor, Dr Alan Coates, that I am able to outline the issue here for Teaching the Codex. Images of the manuscript are reproduced by permission of the Bodleian Library.”

Source: Teachable Features 1: Binding Error, MS Bodl. 565

Guest Post, Images, Outreach

The Nibelungenlied, or Making a Medievalist

Every year, the Oxford German Network runs a series of reading groups for local secondary schools. Yesterday I led the first of the sessions – in at the deep end with some Middle High German in the form of the Nibelungenlied. The groups will continue for the next three weeks. Kafka is up next. In preparation for my session, I wrote a guest post for the OGN’s blog, which you can find by following the link below:

Uns ist in alten mæren wunders vil geseit
von heleden lobebæren, von grôzer arebeit,
von fröuden, hôchgezîten, von weinen und von klagen,
von küender recken strîten muget ir nu wunder hœren sagen

Source: The Nibelungenlied, or Making a Medievalist

(Siegfried’s murder, as shown in Manuscript K (1480-1490))

Articles, Guest Post, Images

Shakespeare in German Translation

I have recently written a guest blog post for the Taylor Institution in Oxford, which is currently playing host to an exhibition on Shakespeare in translation. Have a look at their introduction to what I have to say, and then head on over to their blog to read the rest!

The Taylor Institution’s ‘Shakespeare in Translation’ exhibition illustrates the broad linguistic scope of Shakespeare reception across Europe. His plays have a particularly long history of adaptation and translation in German. This post explores some of the milestones in that history, from anonymous reinterpretation while Shakespeare was still writing, all the way to Brecht’s radio plays in the twentieth century, via the authoritative Schlegel-Tieck edition of the early nineteenth century.

IMG_2879

Conferences

Women’s Responses to the Reformation

I am currently co-organising a workshop focusing on women’s responses to the Reformation with Edmund Wareham and Charlotte Hartmann. The workshop will take place in Oxford on 23 June 2016. Our programme is now available, and you can register for the workshop here (£10).

Part of this project is a crowdsourced translation of the Juttenspiel, a fifteenth-century German play about Pope Joan, which survives only in a Reformation print from 1565. The play has never before been translated into English! We will conclude the workshop with a performance of some of the newly-translated passages. This will take the form of a dramatic reading, along with musical accompaniment, and finishing with a wine reception. The performance is free, and there is no need to register for the evening.

Preliminary Timetable image version

Articles, Manuscripts

William Wey’s Itinerary to the Holy Land: Bodleian Library, MS Bodley 565 (c. 1470)

I’m very excited that my article on binding errors and scribal identity in MS Bodl. 565 is available in the latest issue of the Bodleian Library Record (April 2015). In lieu of an abstract, here is the first paragraph:

In 1456, the middle-aged Master William Wey, bursar of Eton College, set out on the first of several pilgrimages which were to take him to Santiago de Compostela, Rome, and twice to Jerusalem. His descriptions of these journeys survive in a single manuscript, Bodleian Library, MS. Bodl. 565, which has not thus far been the subject of a detailed study. This has allowed the perpetuation of a binding error, despite two separate publications of its contents.

And here is an image of the manuscript in question: DSCF3387