Blog, Guest Post, Images, Incunabula, Manuscripts, Medieval literature

Whose Words? Blog for Pilgrim Libraries

I've recently written a post for the Birkbeck Pilgrim Libraries Network, which you can read over at their website. Here's an extract from the introduction: The co-opting, or re-presenting, of other pilgrimage or travel texts is an integral aspect of pilgrimage writing. This doesn’t mean that pilgrim writings are simply generic – in fact this essential… Continue reading Whose Words? Blog for Pilgrim Libraries

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Articles, Blog, Manuscripts

Merton College, MS. 315. An Introduction

My article introducing Merton College MS 315, the oldest book in Merton College's library, was published in Oxford German Studies (Volume 46, Number 2, 2017). This was a special journal issue on the German manuscripts in Oxford, coming out of a colloquium in honour of Nigel Palmer’s 70th birthday. Abstract This is a brief introduction to… Continue reading Merton College, MS. 315. An Introduction

Blog, Churches, Images, Visits

Aachen Cathedral (and associated thoughts)

Two weeks ago I moved to Berlin with my husband. We are planning to be here until August, while I work on a project part-funded by the DAAD, during which time I will be a postdoctoral researcher at the Großbritannien-Zentrum, part of the Humboldt University. We decided to drive from Oxford to Berlin, stopping in… Continue reading Aachen Cathedral (and associated thoughts)

Blog, Images, Papers

Fortunatus: A German view of Italians in London

I promised a sequel to my last post, in which I looked at what the Libelle of Englyshe Polyce has to say about English attitudes to foreign merchants operating in the country in the late Middle Ages. This time, I’m looking at how those relationships feed into a non-English view of the situation by offering you… Continue reading Fortunatus: A German view of Italians in London

Blog, Images, Incunabula, Papers

The ‘Libelle of Englyshe Polycye’: An English view of Europe in the Fifteenth Century

It can be useful to take a non-linear approach to events – to look back and see our present reflected in the past. The debates filling newspapers and website about the forms British trade with Europe could or should take have made me cast my mind back to the subject of a paper I gave… Continue reading The ‘Libelle of Englyshe Polycye’: An English view of Europe in the Fifteenth Century