Publication: Writing the Jerusalem Pilgrimage in the Late Middle Ages

I'm very excited that my monograph, Writing the Jerusalem Pilgrimage in the Late Middle Ages has been published by DS Brewer. It's available in hard copy and as an ebook.  What do the bursar of Eton College, a canon of Mainz Cathedral, a young knight from near Cologne, and a Kentish nobleman's chaplain have in common? … Continue reading Publication: Writing the Jerusalem Pilgrimage in the Late Middle Ages

The Medievalism Onion: Layers of Interpretation

This post was reblogged from TORCH. Thank you to TORCH and Oxford Medieval Studies for the invitation to write a post for them, and for permission to share it here. It's an introduction to my current project, funded by the Leverhulme Trust. When you hear or read words like ‘medieval’ or ‘Middle Ages’, which images … Continue reading The Medievalism Onion: Layers of Interpretation

‘Objectifying’ the English-language ‘Nibelungenlied’

Scholars, translators, antiquarians, and children’s authors were some of the many anglophone writers who decided to put pen to paper and recreate the Nibelungenlied in English over the course of the long nineteenth century. This variety isn’t just reflected in the content of the texts they produced, but in the material form of the books … Continue reading ‘Objectifying’ the English-language ‘Nibelungenlied’

Medieval Stories for Victorian Children (Dublin History Festival 2018)

In October, I was invited to participate in one of the Irish Research Council's sessions at the Dublin History Festival. My task was to tell a general audience about my work in five minutes, with the help of five PowerPoint slides. I decided to talk about two children's adaptations of the thirteenth-century German epic, the Nibelungenlied, … Continue reading Medieval Stories for Victorian Children (Dublin History Festival 2018)