Guest Post, Manuscripts, Outreach

Teachable Features 1: Binding Error, MS Bodl. 565

I’ve just written a blog for Teaching the Codex, the manuscript pedagogy initiative I run with my colleague, Dr Tristan Franklinos. We are launching a series called ‘Teachable Features’, as a resource for teachers to give quick demonstrations, as well as for anyone interested in learning about manuscripts who does not have immediate access to them.

“I originally described this binding error (amongst other issues relating to the manuscript) in an article for the Bodleian Library Record (April 2015, pp. 22-36), and it is by kind permission of the editor, Dr Alan Coates, that I am able to outline the issue here for Teaching the Codex. Images of the manuscript are reproduced by permission of the Bodleian Library.”

Source: Teachable Features 1: Binding Error, MS Bodl. 565

Guest Post, Images, Outreach

The Nibelungenlied, or Making a Medievalist

Every year, the Oxford German Network runs a series of reading groups for local secondary schools. Yesterday I led the first of the sessions – in at the deep end with some Middle High German in the form of the Nibelungenlied. The groups will continue for the next three weeks. Kafka is up next. In preparation for my session, I wrote a guest post for the OGN’s blog, which you can find by following the link below:

Uns ist in alten mæren wunders vil geseit
von heleden lobebæren, von grôzer arebeit,
von fröuden, hôchgezîten, von weinen und von klagen,
von küender recken strîten muget ir nu wunder hœren sagen

Source: The Nibelungenlied, or Making a Medievalist

(Siegfried’s murder, as shown in Manuscript K (1480-1490))

Articles, Guest Post, Images

Shakespeare in German Translation

I have recently written a guest blog post for the Taylor Institution in Oxford, which is currently playing host to an exhibition on Shakespeare in translation. Have a look at their introduction to what I have to say, and then head on over to their blog to read the rest!

The Taylor Institution’s ‘Shakespeare in Translation’ exhibition illustrates the broad linguistic scope of Shakespeare reception across Europe. His plays have a particularly long history of adaptation and translation in German. This post explores some of the milestones in that history, from anonymous reinterpretation while Shakespeare was still writing, all the way to Brecht’s radio plays in the twentieth century, via the authoritative Schlegel-Tieck edition of the early nineteenth century.

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Guest Post, Manuscripts, Papers

  Source Criticism in the Digital Age

I was asked to translate this Call to Action from the Verband der Historiker und Historikerinnen Deutschlands, originally written by Eva Schlotheuber and Frank Bösch. There has been a significant reduction in the teaching of fundamental historical skills (palaeography, codicology etc) in German universities. This situation is hardly unfamiliar to us in the UK.

Here is Eva Schlotheuber on the background for the debate:
In Germany, a move to organise programmes of study on a modular basis has led to the virtual disappearance of academic source criticism from the university curriculum. As a result, a third of university chairs in the area of ancillary historical skills (palaeography, codicology, epigraphy etc) have been lost in recent decades. At the same time, however, there has been substantial financial and scholarly investment in the digitisation of archival and manuscript sources, largely thanks to the DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), the main German research foundation. If, however, we are to make full use of this digitisation project, it is imperative that the gap in skills training is addressed, before we find ourselves facing a situation in which the Faculty also lacks the relevant expertise. Our aim is to begin a debate about the discipline’s scholarly foundations, culminating in in a discussion at the Historikertag (the annual convention of all German historians) in Hamburg in September 2016.

Please read and comment over at the original English post – discussion is an integral part of this process!

See the whole Call to Action at the Teaching the Codex WordPress site:

  Source Criticism in the Digital Age